heteroic:

glowcloud:

blogoftheplanetoftheapes:

bronte-saurous:

punkrockluna:

bunreal:

bunreal:

ANNE FRANK WAS BI

HOW DID NO ONE EVER TELL ME THIS

I FEEL FUCKING ROBBED

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bisexual_people:_A-F#cite_note-221

!!!!!!!!!!

Excuse me while I memorize this list

I keep trying to tell people this but nobody believes me.

haha yea they edited bits of her diary out which included anne expressing attraction to girls and it’s even been banned from schools because of this!! fun fact

Looked this up and yeah it’s legit!

Unconsciously, I had these feelings even before I came
here. Once when I was spending the night at Jacque's, I could
no longer restrain my curiosity about her body, which she'd
always hidden from me and which I'd never seen. I asked her
whether, as proof of our friendiship, we could touch each
other's breasts. Jacque refused.

I also had a terrible desire to kiss her, which I did.
Every time I see a female nude, such as the Venus in my art
history book, I go into ecstasy. Sometimes I find them so
exquisite I have to struggle to hold back my tears. If only I
had a girlfriend!"

BISEXUAL POETS SERIES: Gabriela Mistral

queerhawkeye:

thehorizontalpoet:

by Jan Steckel, author of the Lambda Literary Award-Winning poetry book The Horizontal Poet.

image

Gabriela Mistral was the pseudonym of Lucila Godoy Alcayaga, a Chilean poet, who was the first Latin American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1945. She was bisexual. Here is her poem “La Extranjera,” which she dedicated to the man who translated her poems from Spanish to French. Below it is my translation of her poem to English.

La extranjera
                                            A Francis de Miomandre


Habla con dejo de sus mares bárbaros,
con no sé qué algas y no sé qué arenas;
reza oración a dios sin bulto y peso,
envejecida como si muriera.
En huerto nuestro que nos hizo extraño,
ha puesto cactus y zarpadas hierbas.

Alienta del resuello del desierto
y ha amado con pasión de que blanquea,
que nunca cuenta y que si nos contase
sería como el mapa de otra estrella.

Vivirá entre nosotros ochenta años,
pero siempre será como si llega,
hablando lengua que jadea y gime
y que le entienden sólo bestezuelas.
Y va a morirse en medio de nosotros,
en una noche en la que más padezca,
con sólo su destino por almohada,
de una muerte callada y extranjera.

The Stranger 

To Francisco de Miomandre

She speaks with a feel of her savage seas
with I don’t know what seaweeds and sands;
she prays to a formless, weightless God,
aged as if she were dying.
In our garden that she made alien to us,
she has planted cactus and rough herbs.
She breathes life from the desert’s wind,
and she has loved with a whitening passion
she never speaks of, for if she were to tell
it would be like the map of another star.
She will live among us eighty years,
yet always as if just arrived,
speaking a tongue that pants and whines
and that only the little beasts understand.
And she will die here in our midst
one night of utmost suffering,
with only her fate as a pillow,
a quiet and foreign death.

I need to point out, the title is The Foreigner, not The Stranger.


Hi! Can you recommend any good bi blogs? I follow a few bi bloggers, but I'd love to fill my dash with bi love! Thanks (:

bisexual-community:

bidyke:

In no particular order, some of my favorite Bi Tumblr blogs <3

O Bi Tumblr, how I love you!

we are SO honored and thrilled to be included in this wonderful group *cries* (happy tears)

sorry for the unrelated posts, xkit let this blog as my default!

ps: i’m laughing because i reblogged two related posts and two unrelated this doing everything in pairs thing is getting worse every day

- queerhawkeye

tor-without-an-h:

if all us bisexual people are “just experimenting” where can we get some goddamn research grants over here

Anonymous

Do you have any words of wisdom for all of the teenage bisexuals out there?

ritchandfamous:

it gets better!

jk, I hate that shit.

It might be better later in life, but that doesn’t matter, you are alive now, and you are important.  Your understanding of yourself is important, your desires are important, your experiences are important.  Keep yourself safe.  Take time to think and research.  Then enjoy yourself the best you can.  You’re statistically more likely to be at a disadvantage, because you are bisexual.  It sucks, but its true.  All you can do is your best.  The world will be unfair, unkind, and invalidating to you.  But the world is wrong.  And you are made of magic.  

blaireaimee:

*slow clap*

Seriously, though. If I had a fucking dollar for every time I lost a friend because they “don’t care what I do, but just don’t want to know or see it”.

Your loss, bitch. I’m fabulous. 

rainbowdalek:

whoops i accidentally made a fandom set of these

the-queerdo-brigade:

kirstendonia:

the-queerdo-brigade:

Shoutout to nonbinary bisexuals who smash both the gender binary and the hetero/homo binary to bits and get ignored and erased and accessed of being binarist against themselves

You are radical and great and anyone who says otherwise can eat it

Shout out to pansexuals who break away from societies expectation for people to love others based on their body/gender/sex.

Shoutout to nonbinary bisexuals who put up with derailing cookie-grabbing queerer-than-thou shit from cis pansexuals when they add their trash to posts about and for nonbinary bisexuals.

[Mary Poppins author P.L.] Travers was a feisty, stereotype-breaking bisexual — a single mom who adopted a baby in her 40s, studied Zen meditation in Kyoto, and was publishing erotica about her silky underwear 10 years before Walt had sketched his mouse. Now that’s a character worth slapping on-screen, instead of this stiff British stereotype determined to steal joy from future generations of children. With her longtime girlfriend and then-adult son erased, this frigid Travers seems like she may not even know how babies are made. Maybe Mary Poppins could sing her a song about it.

Why does it matter that Saving Mr. Banks sabotages its supposed heroine? Because in a Hollywood where men still pen 85 percent of all films, there’s something sour in a movie that roots against a woman who asserted her artistic control by asking to be a co-screenwriter. (Another battle she lost — Mary Poppins’ opening credits list Travers as merely a “consultant.”) Just as slimy is the sense that this film, made by a studio conglomerate in a Hollywood dominated by studio conglomerates, is tricking us into cheering for the corporation over the creator.